On Discipline

Atul Gawande in the The Checklist Manifesto:

Discipline is hard — harder than trustworthiness and skill and perhaps even selflessness. We are by nature flawed and inconstant creatures. We can’t even keep from snacking in between meals. We are not built for discipline. We are built for novelty and excitement, not for careful attention to detail. Discipline is something we have to work at.

Persistance is Hard

Farnham Street:

Persistence is hard. It’s hard to get kicked in the face and to keep going. It hits at your self-esteem. You begin to wonder if you have value. You begin to think you might be crazy… Persistence … anticipates roadblocks and challenges. It gears up for the fact that things never go as planned and expects goals to be hard to attain… If you run into failure, persistence continues… Persistence is antifragile and benefits from setbacks.

What am I being persistent with today? What have I given up on because I was told no the first time? What are some things that I believe in that deserve to be brought up again? What about you?

Goals

Goals cannot sound noble but vague. Targets cannot be so blurry they can’t be hit. Your direction has to be so vivid that if you randomly woke one of your employees in the middle of the night and asked him "Where are we going?" he could still answer in a half-sleep stupor.

~ Jack Welch (Book: Winning)

Bad Leaders. Miserable Jobs.

Photo by Pixabay from Pexels

Quoting from The 4 Disciplines of Execution:

In his book The Three Signs of a Miserable Job, Patrick Lencioni describes brilliantly three reasons individuals disengage from work.

  1. Anonymity: They feel their leaders don’t know or care what they are doing.
  2. Irrelevance: They don’t understand how their job makes a difference.
  3. Immeasurement: They cannot measure or assess for themselves the contribution they are making.

This is why the choice of leaders in Law Enforcement is so important. There are lots of miserable cops counting the days the days until retirement. Do their leaders care what they are doing? Are their leaders showing them how they are making a difference? Can the Officers measure for themselves the contributions they are making?